child immunizations information for pediatrics

Immunizations are an integral part of preventing serious diseases. We follow the American Academy of Pediatrics Guidelines for the timing of these vaccinations. We are also involved with the CDC's National Immunization Program and we participate in the Vaccines For Children (VFC) Program in accordance with the program's strict regulations.

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Vaccine Information

Vaccine Basics

(Click on topics below and you will be directed to informational pages)

List of most common Vaccine-Preventable Diseases

The following links will lead you to the CDC’s main page that describes both the disease and the vaccine(s).

Vaccines are available for all of the following vaccine-preventable diseases:

Vaccine Fact Sheets

The following immunizations are recommended for all children. During routine office visits, Dr. Vayman will tell you at what age each immunization should be given. A recommended schedule is included for your convenience below the immunization information.

Please click on the provided links for a PDF version of the fact sheets for each of the vaccines.

DTaP

Diphtheria/Tetanus/Pertussis

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Hib

Hemophilus Influenza type B

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet  

IPV

Polio

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet  

Hep A

Hepatitis A

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet  

Hep B

Hepatitis B

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet  

MMR

Measles/ Mumps/Rubella

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Varivax

Chicken pox

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Td

Adult Diphtheria/Tetanus

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet  

Prevnar

Strep pneumoniae

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Meningococcal

Meningitis

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

HPV

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Rotateq

Rotavirus

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Tdap

Adult Tetanus/Diphtheria/ Pertussis

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Additional information regarding Inactive Influenza Vaccine:

Flu

Inactive Influenza Vaccine

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

Flu

Live, Intranasal Influenza Vaccine

PDF (Printer Friendly) Fact Sheet

For more information on vaccines not listed above, please visit the Center for Disease Control web site.

Understanding Vaccines and Their Purpose

The following immunizations are recommended for all children.

During routine office visits, Dr. Vayman will tell you at what age each immunization should be given, but a recommended schedule is included in the "Immunization Schedules" section below (click on the blue bar).

Brief Descriptions of the most common vaccines are as follows:

  • DTaP: (Diphtheria, Tetanus and acellular Pertussis): This vaccine protects against Diphtheria, Tetanus (lockjaw), and Pertussis (whooping cough). The most common side effects are usually mild and include fever, some fussiness and local soreness, redness, or swelling at the injection site. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • HIB: (Haemophilus Influenzae B): This vaccine protects against the bacteria H, Flu type B. This bacteria is a leading cause of childhood pneumonia, meningitis, epiglotitis, and blood infections. The most common side effects are low grade fever, redness, swelling, and warmth at the injection site. This usually occurs between 24-48 hrs. after the vaccination is given. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • IPV: This is an injectable polio vaccine that protects against polio. The most common side effects are a low-grade fever and mild soreness at the sight of the injection. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • Hepatitis A: This vaccine protects against the Hepatitis A virus which can cause serious liver disease. Hepatitis A can also cause mild flu-like illness, jaundice, severe stomach pains and diarrhea. The most common side effects are soreness at the injection site, headache, and fatigue. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • Hepatitis B: This vaccine protects against Hepatitis B which is a virus that can cause a severe liver infection. Usually there are only mild side effects including soreness at the injection site. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • MMR (Measles, Mumps, and Rubella): This combination vaccine protects against measles, mumps, and rubella. Usually some redness, soreness, and/or swelling at the injection site may occur. Rarely additional side effects, such as 1-2 weeks after receiving this vaccine a rash and fever may be noticed or 1-3 weeks after giving the vaccine some pain, soreness, or swelling in one or more joints lasting up to three days, may occur. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • Varivax: This vaccine protects against the varicella virus (chicken pox). The most common side effects are usually mild and include fever, local redness, swelling, and a rash. No aspirin products should be given after the vaccine for 6 weeks. Acetaminophen ONLY may be given for these symptoms or used to treat other issues during 6 week period after receiving vaccine.
  • Prevnar: This vaccine protects against pneumococcal disease. Pneumococcal disease is the leading cause of bacterial meningitis, along with causing blood infections and ear infections. The most common side effects are usually mild and include local redness, tenderness or swelling at the injection site and a low-grade fever. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • Meningococcal: This vaccine protects against bacterial meningitis which is an infection of fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord. The most common side effects are usually mild and include fever, redness, or pain at the injection site. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • HPV (Gardasil): This vaccine protects against the human papilloma virus (HPV). The vaccine has been developed to prevent cervical cancer, pre-cancerous genital lesions and genital warts caused by the HPV virus. Current guidelines suggest that this vaccine be given to females between 9-26 years of age. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • Rotavirus: This oral vaccine protects against rota virus. This virus causes severe vomiting and diarrheas. Current guidelines suggest that this vaccine be given to infants between 6-12 weeks if circumstances warrant. Adults and older children can usually fight off this virus without complications, but very young infants have a very difficult time. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • Infuenza: This injectable flu vaccine protects against influenza. Current guidelines suggest that this vaccine be given to infants at 6 months and annually thereafter. The vaccine is split into two injections, 30 days apart, the first time that it is given, but every year after that it is given in one injection. The most common side effects are usually mild and include fever, redness, or pain at the injection site. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • Influenza, Live: This intranasal flu vaccine protects against influenza. Current guidelines suggest that this vaccine can be given to children as young as 2 years of age up to patients 49 years of age. This is a live vaccine, so there are some situations where a patient will not be able to receive this type of vaccine. The most common side effects are usually mild and include fever. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
  • HPV (Gardasil): This vaccine protects against the human papilloma virus (HPV). The vaccine has been developed to prevent cervical cancer, pre-cancerous genital lesions and genital warts caused by the HPV virus. Current guidelines suggest that this vaccine be given to females and males between 9-26 years of age. Acetaminophen may be given for these symptoms.
Immunization Schedules

Immunization schedules published by The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Click on links below and you will be directed to the immunization schedules

Georgia School and Daycare Immunization Requirements

Click on links below and you will be directed to the immunization schedules

Vaccine Policy Statement

Vaccine Policy Statement

  • We firmly believe in the effectiveness of vaccines to prevent serious illness and to save lives.
  • We firmly believe in the safety of our vaccines.
  • We firmly believe that all children and young adults should receive all of the recommended vaccines according to the schedule published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics.
  • We firmly believe, based on all available literature, evidence, and current studies, that vaccines do not cause autism or other developmental disabilities. We firmly believe that thimerosal, a preservative that has been in vaccines for decades and remains in some vaccines, does not cause autism or other developmental disabilities.
  • We firmly believe that vaccinating children and young adults may be the single most important health-promoting intervention we perform as health care providers, and that you can perform as parents/caregivers. The recommended vaccines and their schedule given are the results of years and years of scientific study and data gathering on millions of children by thousands of our brightest scientists and physicians.

These things being said, we recognize that there has always been and will likely always be controversy surrounding vaccination. Indeed, Benjamin Franklin, persuaded by his brother, was opposed to smallpox vaccine until scientific data convinced him otherwise. Tragically, he had delayed inoculating his favorite son Franky, who contracted smallpox and died at the age of 4, leaving Ben with a lifetime of guilt and remorse. Quoting Mr. Franklin’s autobiography:

“In 1736, I lost one of my sons, a fine boy of four years old, by the smallpox...I long regretted bitterly, and still regret that I had not given it to him by inoculation. This I mention for the sake of parents who omit that operation, on the supposition that they should never forgive themselves if a child died under it, my example showing that the regret may be the same either way, and that, therefore, the safer should be chosen.”

The vaccine campaign is truly a victim of its own success. It is precisely because vaccines are so effective at preventing illness that we are even discussing whether or not they should be given. Because of vaccines, many of you have never seen a child with polio, tetanus, whooping cough, bacterial meningitis, or even chickenpox, or known a friend or family member whose child died of one of these diseases. Such success can make us complacent or even lazy about vaccinating. But such an attitude, if it becomes widespread, can only lead to tragic results.

Over the past several years, many people in Europe have chosen not to vaccinate their children with the MMR vaccine after publication of an unfounded suspicion (later retracted) that the vaccine caused autism. As a result of under-immunization, there have been small outbreaks of measles and several deaths from complications of measles in Europe over the past several years.

Furthermore, by not vaccinating your child you are taking selfish advantage of thousands of others who do vaccinate their children, which decreases the likelihood that your child will contract one of these diseases. We feel such an attitude to be self-centered and unacceptable.

We are making you aware of these facts not to scare you or coerce you, but to emphasize the importance of vaccinating your child. We recognize that the choice may be a very emotional one for some parents. We will do everything we can to convince you that vaccinating according to the schedule is the right thing to do. However, should you have doubts, please discuss these with your health care provider in advance of your visit. In some cases, we may alter the schedule to accommodate parental concerns or reservations. Please be advised, however, that delaying or “breaking up the vaccines” to give one or two at a time over two or more visits goes against expert recommendations, and can put your child at risk for serious illness (or even death) and goes against our medical advice as providers at The World of Pediatrics. Such additional visits will require additional co-pays on your part. Furthermore, please realize that you will be required to sign a “Refusal to Vaccinate” acknowledgement in the event of lengthy delays.

Finally, if you should absolutely refuse to vaccinate your child despite all our efforts, we will ask you to find another health care provider who shares your views. We do not keep a list of such providers, nor would we recommend any such physician. Please recognize that by not vaccinating you are putting your child at unnecessary risk for life-threatening illness and disability, and even death.

As medical professionals, we feel very strongly that vaccinating children on schedule with currently available vaccines is absolutely the right thing to do for all children and young adults. Thank you for your time in reading this policy, and please feel free to discuss any questions or concerns you may have about vaccines with any one of us.

For More Information on Vaccines, please, go to the following websites: http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/vpd-vac-basics.htm or http://www.aap.org/healthtopics/immunizations.cfm

You may click here to print our Vaccine Policy Statement: Vaccine Policy Statement (.pdf)

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